Study

Impression Management

A pink and orange abstract illustration

We’re not nearly as susceptible to misinformation in the digital age as we previously thought, says psychology professor Jeremy Cone. Shortly after the 2016 presidential election, “pizzagate” went viral on social media. The story—that Hillary Clinton and several others were running a child sex-trafficking ring out of the basement of a D.C. pizzeria—had no basis

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Abolitionism in Context

Illustration from 1835 of An Anti-Slavery meeting on Boston common

Williams College was an early proponent of the movement to end slavery. But as Darin Li ’21 discovered when doing research for the history course Slavery in the American South, the seemingly good intention prevalent at the college depended on deeply racist ideas. “The Williams College Anti-Slavery Society, founded in the 1820s, did not envision

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Digging Into Chemistry

Photo of Anne Skinner working with her senior honors student, Larissa Silva ’20

Anne Skinner came to Williams in 1966, when her husband Jim was hired to teach chemistry. At the time, there were two full-time female professors at the college, and coeducation was still several years away. But Skinner, armed with a doctorate in chemistry, was determined not to be what she calls a “trailing spouse.” She

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From Ethnography to Art

UNIDENTIFIED ARTIST/ MAKER, PUNU OR FANG CULTURAL GROUP, GABON, FIRE BELLOWS ON STAND, LATE 19TH–EARLY 20TH CENTURY; WOOD, KAOLIN, LEATHER AND PATINA

Michelle Apotsos joined the art history faculty in 2014 as Williams’ first scholar focused on the art of the African continent. Though her work filled a gap in the college’s curriculum, she soon found that the materials and collections already here, particularly those of the libraries and the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), were

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