Study

The Cost of Remembering

Some of the students in Documenting Stories of Escape and Survival took the Winter Study course to hone their filmmaking skills. Others wanted to learn more about conducting oral histories. Still others wanted to better understand the World War II era. They got all that and something they weren’t expecting: a deep connection to the small

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Culture and Climate in National Parks

You might expect to learn about climate change or Native American history and culture during a visit to a national park. In researching her senior thesis, sociology major Elena Zifkin ’16 found that these topics present challenges for interpretive rangers who lead educational programs at parks across the U.S. With a research grant from Williams’ Center

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Language Learning: Renovated

With recent events in both Germany and Russia fueling student interest in those countries, and with the retirement of two longtime professors prompting two new hires, the Department of German and Russian is undergoing what its chair calls “a renovation.” Julie Cassiday, professor of Russian, says language education has expanded beyond memorization to include skills students

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New Heights

Professor of English Alison Case has made a career of analyzing Victorian literature, but it wasn’t until recently that she started writing in the genre herself. Her first work of fiction, Nelly Dean (Pegasus, 2015), retells Wuthering Heights in the voice of one of Emily Brontë’s minor characters, Nelly Dean, the Earnshaw family’s servant and a lifelong resident

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Ivona’s Second Act

After successfully staging Princess Ivona at Williams last March, associate professor of theater Omar Sangare created a Winter Study course that took the student cast and crew to New York City to remount the play at Theatre Row on 42nd Street. The play, by Polish writer Witold Gombrowicz, is a tragicomedy that challenges societal expectations.

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Environmental Planning

As it runs through North Adams, the Hoosic River flows through a concrete chute built decades ago for flood control. The chute obscures the view of the river, it is inhospitable to river organisms, and parts of it are starting to crumble. So for their Environmental Planning class last fall, four students designed a revitalized

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The Art and Economics of Acquisition

The 19th-century landscape Keene Valley, Adirondacks, on view in the Williams College Museum of Art’s (WCMA) Prendergast Gallery, is notable for many reasons. It’s a classic example of a high-quality painting by a Hudson River School artist who’s not widely known. Its subject matter, an expansive valley, evokes the promise of America in the Reconstruction era.

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