Study

Encountering the Original

February marked the 500th anniversary of the death of Aldus Manutius, a man considered by many to be the grandfather of the liberal arts. A Venetian scholar, teacher, editor and publisher, Aldus was the first to publish Aristotle in the original Greek, and he had a hand in determining which texts the scholars and students

Continue Reading →

The Body as Book

During this year’s Book Unbound initiative, at least one course hopes to “disrupt the idea that a book is a material object contained within a binding,” says associate theater professor Amy Holzapfel. In The Body as Book, a collaboration between the theater and dance departments, “We’re asking what it means for the book to be embodied

Continue Reading →

Answering Big Questions

Mathematics professor Satyan Devadoss has received a three-year, $79,591 grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The organization seeks to give “great minds the space and resources to stretch their imaginations.” Devadoss’ project, “Mathematics, Dualism and the Renaissance Revival,” proposes to “break down walls between the physical and cerebral,” he says. The project is divided into four

Continue Reading →

Examining Freedom

The concept of freedom has been on Neil Roberts’ mind for much of his academic career. Is it a state of being or an idea? Are humans born enslaved? How can we talk about freedom without talking about its opposite? And what, truly, is its opposite? In Freedom as Marronage (University of Chicago Press, 2015), Roberts

Continue Reading →

Operations Research

Students in Steven J. Miller’s Operations Research class spent last fall learning mathematical theories and computer science coding programs—and then applying those skills to problems in the community. “I wanted students to find out what happens when they use math in the real world, working with real people on real-life problems,” says Miller, associate professor

Continue Reading →

Biography and Its Discontents

Jorge Sempru?n’s life was an open book. His substantial body of work—memoirs, fictional works and screenplays—drew heavily from his experiences growing up in exile, fighting in the French Resistance, surviving 18 months in a Nazi concentration camp and then working clandestinely from France to overthrow Spain’s military regime. But to Soledad Fox, professor of Spanish

Continue Reading →

Memory, Encoded

What if you could safely keep your most important information in a database that could only be unlocked by your own memory? A web-based model developed by professors Brent Heeringa and Nate Kornell does just that. The model relies on the proven strength of the human ability to correctly recall a series of images. “I like

Continue Reading →