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Object Lab: Encounters With Art

The Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) has transformed the Blashfield Gallery into the Object Lab, a space where students can have close encounters with artworks to deepen their understanding of the subjects covered in classes across the curriculum. Ten faculty members teaching courses including Africana studies, biology, math and theater are taking part this

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New Course Explores Town and Gown

Anthropology professor David Edwards and journalist Christopher Marcisz have teamed up this semester to teach a course about different ways of understanding the relationship between Williams College and Williamstown. Called Town and Gown: Investigating the Relationship of College and Community, the course starts out with a few short assignments. For one, students observe a local

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Unlocking Classical Chinese

Chinese professor Christopher Nugent is helping to publish a groundbreaking series of English translation volumes that will bring never-before-available Chinese texts to future generations of students. Called the Library of Chinese Humanities and published in dozens of volumes over the next several decades by De Gruyter, the series will provide facing-page translations of important Classical Chinese texts

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A Boy’s Perspective on the Holocaust

Jim Shepard’s latest novel, The Book of Aron (Knopf, 2015), has been called “a masterpiece” by the Washington Post; and the New York Times calls him “a master of the verbal fingerprint.” The college’s J. Leland Miller Professor of American History, Literature and Eloquence tells Aron’s story from the boy’s perspective in simple language that

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Linking Brahms and Whitman

 On Nov. 15, the Choral Arts Society of Washington performed a composition by assistant professor of music Zachary Wadsworth at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. In a review of the performance, the Washington Post called Wadsworth “someone to keep an eye on,” saying his composition, Battle-Flags, is “fresh,

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Until When

From July 2012 to 2013, its first year of operation, the Zaatari refugee camp drew more than 3,600 journalists seeking stories of Syrians who fled to Jordan after their lives were ravaged by war. Sumaya Awad ’16 worked in the camp that first year, the summer before her sophomore year at Williams, and witnessed how

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Mis/Communication

Imagine you run into your boss at the farmers market on a Saturday morning. She asks, “What are you up to?” and you assume she knows that you haven’t finished a report due Monday. You launch into an explanation about how you just left your desk for a minute to grab some groceries. She interrupts

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