Study

Teaching to Learn

The students in Susan Langman’s third-grade class at Williamstown Elementary School are trying without success to remove food coloring from water with small, plastic pipettes. But their many exclamations over the impossibility of the task—which simulates removing pollution from the ocean—are cut short when Intekhab Hossain ’17 holds up a crystal-clear glass of water and

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Creating and Connecting

This month, noted poet Craig Dworkin is visiting the Williams College Museum of Art, enlisting students to, as he puts it, “exhaustively collect, catalogue and analyze language found within WCMA’s walls, opening our minds to the oft-unnoticed language around us.” He’ll then turn the students’ documentation into an original work “that’s part poem, part sociological

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A Recipe (Book) for History

Joshua Morrison’s ’16 research of a privately held recipe book assembled by the famous Civil War author and diarist Mary Boykin Chesnut may uncover new details about domestic life in the South. Chesnut, the wife of a wealthy South Carolina planter and former U.S. senator, was an eyewitness to major developments in the Civil War.

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Delusions of Regime Change in Iraq

Michael MacDonald started writing what would become Overreach: Delusions of Regime Change in Iraq (Harvard University Press, October 2014) the day after he returned from a yearlong sabbatical. He’d just completed Why Race Matters in South Africa (Harvard University Press, 2006). And the crumbling regime of Saddam Hussein was in the headlines. MacDonald, a professor

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Other Books

Zombies and Calculus. By Colin Adams, Williams’ Thomas T. Read Professor of Mathematics. Princeton University Press, 2014. Calculus is the ultimate survival tool in this novel about a zombie apocalypse at a liberal arts college in Western Massachusetts.         The Vault of Dreamers. By Caragh M. O’Brien ’84. Roaring Brook Press, 2014.

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Why Liberal Arts?

Amid a national conversation about the value of a college degree—and of the liberal arts, specifically—Williams has launched a yearlong effort to examine and discuss the educational experience it provides. “Why Liberal Arts?: Challenging, Transforming, Connecting” is an initiative of the Committee on Educational Policy (CEP) that focuses on how students experience the liberal arts,

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Sex Work and Sports Events

Greg Mitchell has been researching sex workers in Brazil for nearly a decade, beginning with ethnographic studies of male prostitutes and, more recently, studying the marginalization of female sex workers during global sporting events. Now, the professor of women’s, gender and sexuality studies is expanding his focus beyond Brazil. While working on his Ph.D. in

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Musical Garlands: Ragamala

The sound of a sitar emanates from a first-floor gallery of the Williams College Museum of Art, beckoning visitors to an exhibition of 16 tiny Indian paintings that meld art, music and poetry. The people depicted in the paintings are without expression, but the worlds—and words—around them are rich and colorful. The paintings are part

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