Study

Danger in the Classroom

Danger in the Classroom

When history professor Magnus Bernhardsson was asked to serve as the college’s Gaudino Scholar in 2011, the Arab Spring was in its early days. “I was impressed with the lengths to which young people were willing to put themselves in danger to implement change,” he says. Working to shape opportunities for experiential education and uncomfortable learning for the campus community in his new role, he saw great potential for the interdisciplinary study of danger.

Continue Reading →

Students Help Keep Berkshire Farming

Students help keep Berkshire farming

Samantha Murray ’14 had never before set foot on a farm. Yet at one point over the summer, the beach loving, Southern California native found herself in a field, facing down 50 sheep who’d come barreling over a hill in her direction.

Continue Reading →

One of the Last of the Latin-Named Plants

Isle Royale Ragwort

Admittedly, it’s a mouthful: Packera insulae-regalis. Especially considering that most people—including botanists—will call this new plant species by the simpler Isle Royale Ragwort, named for its home on the far side of Michigan’s Lake Superior.

Continue Reading →

Beyond Words

The Breman Collection

It’s one thing to read a poem by Langston Hughes. It’s quite another to hold an inscribed, first edition of his work—one with a signed birthday card or personal note from him tucked into the pages.

Continue Reading →

A Court Transformed

Building the Judiciary

When the U.S. Supreme Court convened for the first time in history at the Royal Exchange Building in New York City on Feb. 2, 1790, it was a sorry scene, and even the justices knew it.

Continue Reading →

Visualizing the Liberal Arts

Division I

Math majors Hayley Brooks ’12 and Kaison Tanabe ’13 know that a liberal arts education is supposed to prepare students for life, not train them for specific careers. Still, they were curious about the relationship between college major and career path.

Continue Reading →